Wallace Falls Classification and Management Planning

State Parks prepares land use plans through an agency-wide planning system called Classification and Management Planning or CAMP.  CAMP is a multi-staged, public participation-based planning process for individual parks that culminates with adoption of park land classifications, a long-term park boundary, and a park management plan.  The combination of these deliverables constitutes a land use plan.  The CAMP process typically takes ten to fifteen months to complete.  

Wallace Falls State Park
Located in Snohomish County, Wallace Falls State Park is a 1,380-acre camping park with shoreline on the Wallace River, Wallace Lake, Jay Lake, Shaw Lake, and the Skykomish River. Located on the west side of the Cascade Mountains, the park features a 265-foot waterfall, old-growth coniferous forests, and fast-moving rivers and streams. 

 

Public Workshop

To introduce the project and to get your input a public workshop will be held from:

Date:                Wednesday November 15, 2017

Time:                5:30 to 7:30 pm

Location:          Sultan City Hall Community Room,

                         319 Main Street

                         Sultan, WA

Wallace Falls
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Contact Us

Randy Kline, Park Planner
Project Lead
 
Email
P.O. Box 42650
Olympia, WA 98504
Ph:  (360) 902-8658
Fx:  (360) 586-0207 

Stage One - Identify issues and concerns

The purpose of this stage is to understand what is important to the park community, what to change or save in the state park. This helps get a sense of the range and type of issues that need to be considered through the planning process.

Stage Two – Exploring alternative a

pproaches


At this stage, the planning team suggests potential alternative approaches to address the various issues and concerns raised by people in stage one. No preferred alternative is established; rather this is an opportunity to understand the range of possibilities.

Stage Two Documents

Stage Three – Preparing preliminary recommendations

The best ideas from the alternative approaches developed in stage two are combined into a preliminary plan in this stage. The plan includes recommendations for use and development of land, changes to property boundaries and ways to address issues raised during the planning process. Another important document completed at this stage is the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) checklist that describes environmental impacts of the recommendations.

Stage Three Documents

Stage Four – Preparing final recommendations

At stage four, final adjustments are made to recommendations and submitted to the seven-member Parks and Recreation Commission for approval. The public is encouraged to attend the Commission meeting and provide testimony or to provide written comment.

Stage Four Documents

Miscellaneous Documents